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Let’s get a few things straight.

The curse, after the Fall, is description, not prescriptive.  In regard to women says, “I will greatly  multiply your pain in childbirth, in pain you shall bring forth children; yet your desire shall be for your husband, and he shall rule over you.” (Genesis 3:16 NASB)

It doesn’t say “your desire will be to rule over your husband” or any nonsense like that.  It says, despite the fact it’s going to hurt like hell to give childbirth, you’re still going to desire your husband (and what follows that… babies) and he will rule over you.  That sounds about right when you look at the general human condition for the past couple thousand years.  Women want the men in their lives and men treat the women like shit.  I mean children.  Or slaves or property.

That doesn’t mean that’s what God intended.  It means that’s what ended up happening, due to sin.  Now, you can choose to live under the curse, or you can choose to live beyond it.

And the male pronoun “he” is NOT genderless.  Say what you want: it implies gender and it always has.  The female pronoun “she” does not convey more gender than the male pronoun.  It conveys the same amount.  Since English does not have a neuter pronoun that indicates personhood, why are we so afraid of using “he” and “she” interchangeably?  God does not have gender, so why must we assign it?  And if saying “he” doesn’t indicate maleness, then why on earth would saying “she” indicate femaleness?  Do you want to be stuck in an oppressive religion and culture forever?

Moreover, Jesus’ gender on earth does not dictate his deity.  Rather, the other way around should be true.  Jesus is a perfect human, not a perfect man.  (But as one writer noted, tongue in cheek, “If [Jesus] had been female, no one would have noticed when he gave up his life for the sake of others.”  Not to mention the cultural climate would probably not have taken him seriously if he had come as a woman.)

Think about it.  And free yourself to serve a genderless God who is equally for both women and men.

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I’ve been reading C.S. Lewis’ Space Trilogy.  I’m currently on Perelandra, having already read Out of the Silent Planet.  The first one was okay; I actually enjoyed it.  But the second one is giving me all sorts of anxiety.  (If you haven’t read this book, but think you might, you might not want to read my blog, but as I’m not even all the way through, I can’t give the ending away.)

So far, it is a new Adam & Eve scenario with a few differences.  There are three players, like the original, but the King (Adam) is missing.  The Lady (Eve) is there, plus the devil, plus a fellow from our own planet, Ransom.  And the devil is now doing his best to convince the Lady that she should disobey Maleldil (God) because it will make her wiser, and besides, He actually wanted her to disobey, to become her own person, etc.

There is something about reading about people considering making stupid decisions when they know the right one that gives me anxiety and stress.  Probably because I liken it too much to my own self and how stupid it is to make sinful choices when I know what the good, right and true choices are.

But it also feels forced and tedious to me.  It is another way, a long drawn out and detailed way, of explaining original sin, and really the daily sin we encounter.

And it feels terrible.  Honestly terrible to consider that something so pure should become corrupted.  Even if the Lady makes the right decision, the decision to obey, she will never return to her original state of purity and innocence.  That has been forever tainted to some extent.  And where is the stupid King in all of this?  If Lewis is going to present this story in the context of patriarchal man who needs to protect the woman in his life, then by golly, that man had better be doing his job.

So perhaps I am merely reacting to exactly what Lewis hoped to present, but it’s hard to say.  Either way, this book is a struggle for me to read because I do not like it.  Perhaps I will change my mind by the end?

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